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One of the most frustrating aspects of growing a fitness business is developing others to sell your services for you.

But until you are able to multiply yourself in this area of your business, you are forever tied to speaking with every prospect and personally completing every consult just to bring new revenue in the door.

If you want to step out of the sales role in your business, follow these steps to get the right people on board and lead them to success month after month.

Once you have the systems and tools to duplicate yourself AND understand how to hire, train, and develop someone else to perform the sales role in your business effectively… you’ll be on your way to more sales, more freedom, and more growth!

1.    Get clear on your vision

Ask yourself questions to get clear on your vision for:

Your Life

What does your ideal day look like? What do you want to have more freedom to do outside of your business?

Your Business

How many clients do you want your studio to be serving? What type of revenue will that generate for your business each month?

Hiring Your First Sales Professional

What are the qualities that you want to see in someone else representing your business with a new prospective client?

2.    Check your mindset

Too many fitness business owners have the mindset of “I’m the only one who can sell.”

If you believe you are the only one who can do it, you are right. If you want to do everything forever, keep selling by yourself.

In order to grow as a fitness business owner, you’ve got to adopt the mindset that others can sell, and you must learn how to recruit, develop, and lead others to sell for you so you can make a bigger impact.

3.    Assess your team

Prospective clients pay for VALUE.

V = CE + R + R (Value = Client Experience + Relationships + Results You Deliver)

If the people you’re recruiting (for any role!) aren’t a good fit for your culture, chances are that they are not going to support your mission of providing a great client experience or building close relationships with those clients.

4.    Enroll your team

There is nothing more frustrating from a staff member’s perspective than to not understand what success looks like, what is expected of them, and how to perform their job well.

Enroll your team by:

1.    Developing a scorecard which has three main components:

a.    Mission – The essence of why the top exists and should be tied directly to your company’s overall mission.

b.    Outcomes – The 3 - 8 things that someone in the role must get done, listed in order of importance.

c.    Competencies – What a candidate must bring to the table in order to get the job done such as honesty, integrity, etc.

2.    Understanding what motivates your staff and putting incentives in

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BACPR 800

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an umbrella term for all diseases of the heart and circulation including coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, atrial fibrillation (AF), congenital heart disease and inherited heart conditions. There are an estimated 7 million people living with cardiovascular disease in the UK with coronary heart disease being the single biggest killer in the UK.

An ageing and growing population and improved survival rates from cardiovascular events could see these numbers rise still further. Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) occurs when coronary arteries become narrowed by a build-up of atheroma, a fatty material within their walls. The pain or discomfort felt from such narrowing is called angina and if a blockage occurs it can cause a myocardial infarction (heart attack). Most CHD deaths are caused by a myocardial infarction.   

Healthy eating, regular exercise and smoking cessation are important elements in the prevention of further cardiovascular events. For those who have a myocardial infarction, undergo revascularisation or have heart failure, attending a comprehensive cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation programme has been strongly recommended in recent scientific research papers and has become part of routine cardiology care in the UK over the last few years. The physical activity and exercise component of a programme is an integral part both in the early stages of recovery and also in the longer term. The role of an exercise professional, who must be able to demonstrate that they have the appropriate training, qualifications and skills, is important in delivering effective long-term exercise programmes and in maintaining long-term exercise habits.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the UK with almost 160,000 individuals dying from CVD every year in the UK. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single biggest killer in the UK and is responsible for nearly 70,000 deaths in UK each year, an average of 190 people each day, or one death around every eight minutes. Most deaths from CHD are caused by a heart attack. An estimated 915,000 people alive in the UK today (640,000 men and 275,000 women) have survived a heart attack. More than 2.3 million people in the UK are living with some form of coronary heart disease (CHD) and more than 500,000 with heart failure.  

Risk factors for CVD, both modifiable and non-modifiable are well established and lifestyle interventions which target the modifiable risk factors have been shown to have many benefits including reducing cardiovascular mortality, reducing hospital admissions and improvements in health related quality of life. 

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BACPR Executive Director Sally Hinton
 

Physical inactivity is a key preventable risk factor of CVD and is considerably more prevalent than other major risk factors. Increasing overall levels of sustained in physical activity and avoidance of prolonged sedentary behaviour are associated with reduction of CVD risk. In addition low physical fitness is a strong independent predictor of CVD events. The mechanisms by which physical activity and increased fitness may decrease the risk of developing coronary heart disease include the favourable effect that

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Let’s make this perfectly clear: The difference between qualifications and CPD courses

We all do courses and training to improve our knowledge and skills, but what do these terms mean? Do they result in you being appropriately qualified to teach the new skill to your clients and customers? Tom Bell, Director of PD:Approval, with experience of endorsing REPs-recognised training for over 12 years, will tell you everything you need to know about choosing the appropriate piece of training…

In the course of our work as the endorsement body for REPs, we come across many fitness professionals, training providers, employers and general public who are unclear about the difference between a qualification and a piece of continuing professional development (CPD) training, or indeed realise there is a difference.

The simple explanation is that qualifications are listed on the Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF), which is the national framework of UK qualifications, and the certificate of achievement is issued by an Awarding Organisation. Your certificate means you are ‘qualified’ in that subject. Certificates for qualifications included in the REPs framework will include the REPs CPD point logo.

CPD can be developed by any individual or organisation, but unless it is endorsed by a recognised body, ie PD:Approval, does not come with any safeguards in quality for learners or any support for the learner if things go wrong. The certificate will be issued by the endorsed provider and means you are ‘certified’ in that subject. Certificates for PD:Approval endorsed training will include the REPs, CPD point, and PD:Approval Endorsed logos.

There is also a lack of understanding about what learners should know about the training they are undertaking – will there be an assessment, what does the certificate mean, is my insurance affected? We hope to be able to provide a clear picture to help you in the training choices you make.

Education and training is an essential part of any profession and most professional membership bodies require a qualification or degree to gain entry. Each profession and sector is different and all have their own ways to protect the integrity of their industry and qualifications. But they all recognise the importance of the provision of recognised skills for employment so that the learner is competent as well as confident in what they are doing.

REPs and PD:Approval champion the provision of recognised skills and aim to ensure that we continue to drive up achievement within the UK through the REPs framework of qualification categories (Level 2, 3 and 4). Coupled with PD:Approval endorsed CPD training to support ongoing learning, this offers a clear career pathway for REPs members to progress whilst gaining recognition for their efforts. More importantly, it gives them peace of mind knowing that all endorsed training is covered by their REPs insurance (REPs members can use other bodies to provide their insurance but REPs insurance guarantees cover for REPs recognised training).

To be able to make a more informed choice it is important to understand the detail behind the different levels of learning.

PDApproval

Vocational Qualifications:

Vocational qualifications provide the skills for employment

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Level 3 is just the beginning for a Personal Trainer

Once someone has passed their Level 3 personal trainer course and achieved the qualification, it’s easy to fall into the trap of believing that studies are done and work begins. The focus will naturally move towards bringing in clients, client retention and job prospects. Prospects should of course be paramount in a personal trainer’s thoughts, but never at the expense of continued education.  In an increasingly popular and competitive marketplace, it’s becoming ever more important for one to continue to learn and develop new skills. Indeed, by choosing not to, a personal trainer may well be harming their potential earnings and job security.  

“Put yourself in the potential client’s position. They have any number of personal trainers they could work with. If you were that client, would you go with the trainer who has a Level 3 certificate and some workplace experience, or the trainer with a Level 3 certificate who also has sports conditioning, suspension fitness, kettlebells and Olympic lifting certificates plus workplace experience?” comments Steele Williams, Director of TRAINFITNESS.

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So, what are some of the other benefits of upskilling and what sort of courses could a personal trainer benefit from?

Working with niche clients

There are a range of different clients out there with different needs. Some might be looking to improve general health, fitness or fat loss, while others will have specific needs they’ll want a personal trainer to address. These might be sport-specific, strength or posture-focused. With the population becoming far more in tune with what it takes to live a healthier lifestyle and having a much great awareness of and interest in specific skills and training protocols, personal trainers need to have a greater range of knowledge under their belts to satisfy client requirements. Courses such as Padwork, Sports Conditioning or Olympic Lifting can widen a client base and ensure that clients have their every specific need met.

Staying relevant

The health and fitness industry is one of the fastest evolving out there. Each day brings new techniques and innovations. After only a few months of working as a personal trainer it’s likely that something has changed or a new technique has become popular.  Training techniques can go in and out of fashion, so it’s a good idea to upskill to stay ahead of the game. One day kettlebell training is all the rage, the next group exercise, HIIT or outdoor fitness. For a personal trainer, having those additional courses under their belt can help maintain relevancy and most importantly, keep a PT busy.

Keeping it interesting

A personal trainer might get bored delivering the same sessions week in week out.  Clients might get bored receiving the same sessions week in week out too, even if they’re seeing progress. By upskilling and making sure there is the ability to offer a variety of training styles and activities, a personal trainer can keep workouts fresh and interesting, even if it’s only a case of adding one or two new ideas and techniques into the

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Strength Training for Distance Running

At first it might appear as though training with heavy weights and distance running are worlds apart. Why would the distance runner need to get weight on the bar and bust their gut in the gym when they could be out pounding the roads and getting more miles in?

But it’s actually in this very question that the problem lies. It’s this constant pounding that the body takes that can lead to injuries and stagnate performance levels.

Clearly there needs to be a certain volume of work completed which will be different for every individual and for each event that is being trained for, however unnecessary volume can at best be wasted time and at worst lead to overtraining and/or injury.

This time could be better spent strengthening the body and recovering.

What do the best do?

At the highest level, distance runners embrace strength training and are seen to be engaging in strength and conditioning programmes that they feel are a key area to their success.

Here is a comment from Bernard Lagat after being beaten by Mo Farah in the Monaco 5000m:

“To be able to beat Mo Farah I need to put my training up a notch," Lagat said. "I am happy with my speed. The only thing I need to work on is the strength. I can see that Mo Farah is a guy that is very strong. He is like a racing horse. What I need to do are the things that will get me even with him.”

And what about our very own Paula Radcliffe? It’s well known that Paula is an extremely hard trainer and engages in many types of training to improve her performance. Here’s a quote from her physiotherapist Gerard Hartmann outlining the approach they took with Paula:

“Paula runs twice a day, and that may account for 1.5 to 2 hours of her day. On top of that she is spending between another two and five hours between her treatments, her stretching routine, her plyometrics, her core stability, and her strength training."

“It is no different to what Sebastian Coe did with his father, Peter and with George Gandy many years ago. Seb Coe was not the biggest of athletes, but they developed him into an athlete. He did not just run, he did dynamic exercises, plyometric exercises, strength exercises, squats, lunges, and heavy weight sessions. We brought this approach to Paula Radcliffe’s training program after the Olympic Games and it was less than a year later that we saw she won her first world title”.

Although it seems pretty clear that the top runners are looking to strength and conditioning to gain that extra edge, for recreational runners the message doesn’t seem to have passed down as many runners are not aware of the potential benefits of a good strength training programme.

Is it our god given right as a human to be able to run? Shouldn’t we be doing a little more to prepare our bodies for the

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